Home Cancel Culture Editor at New York Times Who Was “Disturbed” By American Flags Claims Rising Crime Is Due ‘Grief”

Editor at New York Times Who Was “Disturbed” By American Flags Claims Rising Crime Is Due ‘Grief”

by Graham Allen Team

New York Times editorial board Mara Gay — who came under fire recently for saying she was “disturbed” by seeing the American flag — is back with another outrageous opinion.

During an interview on MSNBC, Gay suggested that experts believe spiking crime across the country is due to “trauma, grief, and homelessness.”

Or, maybe it has to do with Democrats’ push for defunding the police.

“I think there’s a couple of things going on, the United States has a gun problem. We have too many guns on our streets so we need federal action to get them off the streets because individual states and cities, like New York, cannot stop the flow of guns from coming into New York City, for example, without federal action,” Gay said.

“Just rational action to prevent bad actors from getting their hands on guns. That’s the first thing. The other thing is we should just recognize that people who study violence and crime will tell you right now that it is too soon to know and understand exactly why we were seeing the time spike across the country that we are,” she added.

“But those who have worked on this issue for a long time know — what they will tell you is that this is not surprising given the level of disruption, trauma, grief, joblessness, homelessness, and just general upheaval that the United States has gone through, particularly communities of color and people living in poverty across the United States,” she claimed.

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During an interview earlier this month, Gay said she was disturbed to see pickup trucks with “dozens of American flags” and Trump paraphernalia during a recent trip to Long Island, New York.

“I was on Long Island this weekend,” she said. “And I was really disturbed.”

“I saw, you know, dozens and dozens of pickup trucks with expletives against Joe Biden on the back of them, Trump flags, and in some cases, just dozens of American flags, which is also just disturbing, which essentially the message was clear, this is my country. This is not your country. I own this.”

MARA GAY: The reality is here that we have a large percentage of the American population — I don’t know how big it is, but we have tens of millions of Trump voters who continue to believe that their rights as citizens are under threat by simple virtue of having to share the democracy with others. I think as long as they see Americanness as the same as one with whiteness, this is going to continue. We have to figure out how to get every American a place at the table in this democracy, but how to separate Americanness, America, from whiteness. Until we can confront that and talk about that, this is really going to continue.

I was on Long Island this weekend, visiting a really dear friend and I was really disturbed. I saw, you know, dozens and dozens of pickup trucks with expletives against Joe Biden on the back of them, Trump flags, and in some cases, just dozens of American flags, which is also just disturbing, which essentially the message was clear, this is my country. This is not your country. I own this.

And so until we’re ready to have that conversation, this is going to continue. What really is concerning to me as well is, it’s not just Democrats in Congress. I think there’s a large percentage of Americans, even some of my colleagues in journalism, who are invested in some way in pretending that this isn’t the threat that it is. That is the real concern. Because, you know, the Trump voters who are not going to get onboard with democracy, they’re a minority. You can marginalize them, long-term. But if we don’t take the threat seriously, then I think we’re all in really bad shape.

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Gay is a well-known leftist.

Just last month she argued in favor of a “truth and reconciliation commission” so Americans can be less racist.

“I was there in Charleston when those families were in the courtroom and said, we forgive you, they said to Dylann Roof. It was extraordinary. But I think we really need it to be seen not just as a heroic act but as something to emulate, and I think probably this is a country that needs a truth and reconciliation commission just like South Africa had but given, of course, the lack of consensus around the riot from January, I think we’re a ways off, unfortunately, from that,” she added.

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